If your computer can recognize the notes in the sound?

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Asking in General, out of pure curiosity. I, for instance, completely musically illiterate, but sometimes you want something posochinyat, and I was wondering is it possible to create a program (or such already is?), which can be just humming the motif into the microphone, and she lay hum the melody on the notes and, say, lose those notes sounds piano? Then of course you can be in manual notes fit somewhere longer make a sound, somewhere shorter, etc., so all was neatly. In General, I would like a program where you can sing the motive, and then to lose it, but different musical instruments.
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Notes the computer can distinguish — for example, work all the software tuners for guitar and others But for voice I don't know... I mean, to sing, and she would have them once in a fingering turned.
For writing his music to start, try GuitarPRO. There it is possible to record (notes, true) and then listen to how it will sound on different instruments. But we need to delve into music theory. Here.
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I'd be looking at www.iis.fraunhofer.de/ because they are ahead of all these things.
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I'm afraid that if you notes anything not fumble, and humming the notes will be able to vryatli. because the program will be difficult to recognize. as a crutch you can certainly use a thread of the tuner that shows the note and there you do like the thread record. but this approach does not guarantee success.
I would advise where-thread to get piano/piano/synth and try singing, to find a note on the keys.
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At the time, I solved a similar problem — I liked the piano part in one song, simple but beautiful, and I decided to learn to play. Because hearing does not have the selection would be too painful, came up with nauchnoi side: spectrometer spectraPLUS + a table of frequencies of notes (octave-system, the flats and sharps on the calculator to count) + editor guitarPro.
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The spectrometer can or live during the catch on the chart "frequency-amplitude" most briskly-changing "goriki" (amplitude), see the frequency peaks and compare with the musical table:
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or, even easier, in this form, where the introduction of color components obtained spectrum of the "frequency-amplitude-time", allowing us to constantly rewind at the right moments, all the information is stored:
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once seen (red areas), at which point what's the note(i.e., until the frequency) sounded.
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If musical notation do not own, guitarPro include keyboard mapping, looking at the same Wikipedia where the note is, and poke. However, the tempo, time signature, note length and other buns have had to twist (if you bother, then on the last picture you can catch and pace(the distance between the same fragments), and length of notes (strip length or the distance between them)).
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With voice, however, will be difficult, because the values of the frequencies is unlikely to be discrete, and be one hell of a dance.
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Ugh, just remembered. it was hard-way. Easy way program AmazingMIDI, which lays out the wav to MIDI (lots of options will help you choose the balance). MIDI then you can import the same guitarPro
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Specific about the program you don't know, but for vocals there's a good setting mechanisms.
Virtual Studio is a plug-in Cubase Vari Audio in its basis lies the recognition of notes in the sound.
Here's a demo video www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkvGsyyrqNY
Try to look like standalone apps. They need to be.
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Notice the voice of the right is very good.
As a joke he sang a note "La" in a good tuner to keep the note at a certain height was not more than a fraction of a second, then either above or below.
Software solutions there are, but it's easier to hum the tune and send it to a fellow musician if no such I can to help you with this.
Or to study music.
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